plymouth

Familiarity in Changed Places

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Val drove into Tambo, a little anxious, anticipating the changes wrought by bitumen roads, paved streets and modernisation, but really hoping for the familiar to manifest itself.

It was 55 years since Bill had wallowed into town first the first time at the wheel of the Plymouth Belvedere in June, 1957. Bill had come to take up a job as a roughneck at ODE’s Oil Rig, 25 miles out along the Tambo-Alpha Road.

The Land-Rover was an absolute money pit and the trailer proved too lights for the rigours of Heartbreak Corner

The Land-Rover was an absolute money pit and the trailer proved too lights for the rigours of Heartbreak Corner

It was 54 years since Val had trundled out of town at the wheel of a 1940’s Land-Rover towards a Channel Country thirsting in the clutches of drought. That was in April, 1958.

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Welcome to Tambo sign. Tambo is on the banks of the Barcoo and takes its name from the aboriginal word for ‘hidden place’.

We drove past the Welcome to Tambo sign and did a quick reconnoitre seeking places of the past looking for a connection with the present. Feeling welcome, yes, but wondering what it would be like to visit the places of the distant past.

General Store Tambo

This was Miller’s Store in 1957. Obviously Col Millier sold it and moved on. This is a 1986 picture taken by a University of Queensland country towns project

Millers Store – completely gone – business and premises. A classic general store in a country town that supported the rural community – incredible range, personal service. Col Miller obviously not here.  Val had expected that he would never leave.

Tambo Bakery_1986

THEN Tambo Bakery was a typical small town bakery in 1957. It served the local community and nearby communities like Alpha. 1986 picture from QU.

The Bakery – business – gone, but the building lives on as the home of the Tambo Teddies.  A typical bakery in 1957 it did the basics well, nothing fancy like you see in the little boutique bakeries of today.  The owner was possibly Col Pengilly and used to drive his bread to Alpha in his truck along the Tambo-Alpha Road past the ODE Oil Rig.

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NOW The bakery was taken up as Tambo Teddies workshop. Some 29,000 teddies have made their way around the world.

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The Tambo Post office was built in 1904. This is where Val used to pick up the pay cheque from ODE.

The Post Office – totally intact. Ahh, the times that Bill & Val travelled the 25 miles in from the Oil Rig to Tambo to check the mail and hope that the cheque from ODE’s head office in Sydney was waiting for them.

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THEN Tambo Hospital much as it was in 1957 and 1958. Val was in the maternity ward which was further on. Billy chatted to people on the front verandah when he stayed overnight in 1958 when he hurt himself at the Oil Rig.

NOW. Val outside of the Tambo Primary Health Centre in 2012. The maternity section she used in 1957 no longer exists.

The Hospital – once a regional facility – downsized and downgraded to a Primary Health Centre. Val came to Tambo with 3 little ones and the next child 3 months away.  Val gave birth in the no longer existing maternity section.

Club Hotel

The Club Hotel in Tambo. One of Bill’s watering holes. Pretty much as it was in 1957 when John Steer was the licencee.

The Club Hotel – Bill’s favourite pub – intact and still selling beer and food. We went there for dinner. There are stories to tell about this place.

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The Royal Hotel now but new in 1957 having been rebuilt in 1954. It was one of the original 4 hotels in the town.

The Royal Carrangarra Hotel – Bill’s other favourite pub – intact and still selling the essentials. In 1957, it was the new hotel having just been constructed. And much to the chagrin of the locals, was virtually totally booked out by those damn yanks from the Oil Rig. And to those damn yanks, it was hardly good enough.  To be good enough it would need to have been ‘AA boy… All American’.

The Police Station and Lockup – where Bill was so close to being a guest – totally renewed.  Bill was so close to spending time in the lockup he’d have been happy to know that it is totally gone and there is a new police station and lockup.

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This is where they serve the Great Tucker at the Club Hotel in Tambo. Val and Bill had dinner here, it was good and there was plenty of it.

The reconnoitre done, it was time to get the lowdown on where to start looking for the Oil Rig site. So as my custom is, I went to the bar of the Club Hotel and looked for a local who might know. In 5 minutes flat we hit paydirt  with Teddy Peacock who had been around since 1965.  We stayed for dinner.

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Our caravan at the Tambo Caravan park. Daphne managed to put us her original van. It was clean and the price was certainly right. Would not have done for some of our more discerning kin but OK for us.

Then off to the budget option in accommodation at the Tambo Caravan Park where our host Daphne Cartwright was friendly and shared plenty of good information to help us in our quest.  Daphne wears many hats and is a veritable local encyclopaedia.  She’s only been in town since 1988 but she knows her way around.

The Transport to Heartbreak Corner

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On our  return to Heartbreak Corner, we zoomed along in veritable lounge chairs, on bitumen road in a vehicle manufactured in Japan.

We listen to stereo music of choice – John Williamson’s Warragul – probably not everybody’s choice, but ours.

Every now and again we tweak the air-conditioning to maintain that perfect level of ambiance for travelling comfort.

 

4 door Plymouth Belvedere

4 door Plymouth Belvedere like Bill and Val purchased in 1957, expect that theirs was a very nice green and didn’t have the chrome to create the different coloured area on the bottom portion.

A lifetime ago, Val wallowed along the corrugated dusty road to the outback in an overstated Yank Tank.

Dash of Belvedere

Steering Wheel and Dash of the Plymouth Belvedere. Apart from being left-hand drive this is the right look.

The windows were open, quarter-glass directing wind to the cool the driver and front passenger. If they passed a vehicle from the other direction, that had to quickly roll the up windows to avoid being smothered in dust. And they followed at a very respectable distance to avoid the dust cloud kicked up by the vehicle in front.

There was the radio for entertainment, when a station was close enough. The radio if it was going to prevail had complete with the roar of wind from open windows. And the seats, their 1957 Plymouth Belvedere had a lounge chair in the front and a lounge chair in the back.

Bill loved American big and beautiful and when he received the first tranche of money from their mineral sands lease being taken up, he paid the deposit to finance a beautiful green version of this car.  Have a listen to how it didn’t run. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W8yB0aNbxh0

Plymouth Belvedere 2 door

Plymouth Belvedere 2 door. Bill and Val had the 4 door version of the car. It was a big green and beautiful. Bill licked the steam off it.

After the rest of the money failed to materialise, Bill and Val were stuck with the big Yank Tank and the payments that went with it. Job prospects in Maryborough were poor and so this beauty had to go west for Bill to earn its keep. That’s what set them on the road to Heartbreak Corner.

The trek to Heartbreak Corner was taken just 12 years after WW2 had finished and the US was Australia’s new friend. The general populace were still learning more of the horrors of the Japanese treatment of Australian POW’s in Changai, on the Burma Railway and in other places. A wallowing Yank Tank was in perfect keeping with the times.

 

54 years later, we returned to Heartbreak Corner in a Mitsubishi Pajero.

Mitsubishi Pajero 4WD

The Mitsubishi Pajero in which Bill and Val travelled on the Return to Heartbreak. The sturdy 4WD was much better suited to the 1957 roads than the flashy Plymouth.

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Mitsubishi Zero Fighter from WW2. The Allies couldn’t match it for speed or manoeuvrability until well into the war. This image is of one used in the making the movie Pearl Harbour.

It was Mitsubishi that made the Zero which had a 12 to 1 kill rate against the allies. It was a faster, more maneuverable fighter plane that the allied aircraft could not compete with until 1942.

How times have changed.  It would have been unthinkable to drive a Mitsubishi in 1957.   And now, I wouldn’t even think about buying a American Motor Vehicle.  Although, in Spain, where Pajero means ‘wanker’, I would be driving a Montero.

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