confinement

Monday Rounds at Tambo Hospital

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Val had just given birth to her 4th child Allen at the Tambo Hospital on the 7th September, 1957 and was now recovering in the Maternity Ward.

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The confinement time in maternity used to be around a week which gaves mothers time to get to recover and prepare for the rigours of home life with a new baby.

The normal confinement time was a week. This time was intended to give the new mother time to recover and the time to get the baby into routine.

Labour had come quickly and had caught them by surprise and Bill had to do the last minute shop by himself at Millers General Store.

Val had received a late night visit from Bill who had pleaded with her to get out early.

On the Monday morning, the Matron was doing the rounds of the wards.

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Matrons were real authority figures. Few patients would question a direction from a nursing sister, let alone a matron in 1957.

‘How are we, today, Mrs Wight?’, Matron asked, in that caring way that good nurses do.

‘I’m doing fine, thank you’, Val responded, ‘but actually, (long pause), I really do need to go home’.

‘Oh no, you need your rest, Mrs Wight’, responded Matron in her best matron manner.

‘But I do really need to go home’, persisted Val.

‘No! You need to be here and you need to be getting your rest’, came the firmer, more authoritarian response.

‘You see, my husbands not really coping’, bargained Val, ‘he really can’t manage’.

‘Well, he’s just going to have to’, finalised Matron, ‘he’s just going to have to.’ You’re staying here!’ in end of conversation tone.

imgres-1There wasn’t much doubt Matron and Sergeant Eiser had a good working relationship and that the channels of communication were open.

So Val stayed the usual 7 days in hospital, Bill got by as best he could, and all of the children made it too.

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