Bill Wight

Bill has been more or less active in family history for almost 2 decades. Bill is really keen that family stories don't get lost and instigated this site to actively promote recording family stories in a public forum so that other people might be inspired to capture their own family's story. He has the view that by publishing, he might just find someone who has a story to tell

Topping the Teatotallers

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Bill had Sergeant Eiser’s ‘we’re watching you’ message confirmed every time he drove into town. The police had him absolutely bluffed.

Bill was absolutely bluffed about the ‘We’re watching you’ warning from Police Sergeant Eiser and Constable Stagg.  The cops were as good as their word. Every time Bill had to go into Tambo, he had it confirmed that they watching.

Billy & Johanne - 1957

All Oil Drilling and Exploration (ODE) vehicles available to Bill were clearly marked with decals like this one on the door of the International ute.

In the end, it just wasn’t worth going to the pub.  Every vehicle had ODE decals on the doors and stood out like a sore thumb.  If he went incognito in the Land-Rover, it would break down and consume more repair time and more money on parts.  In any case, it had Mineral Sands signwriting on it and would be readily noticeable.

Bill had been on a serious alcoholic slide for a couple of years.  He had drunk his way through much of the initial payment for the Fraser Island mineral sands.  If there were more options for single mothers in 1957, he would have been on his own.

But Bill’s slide was arrested with a jolt, after he weighed up some options.

He had no doubt that the Sergeant Eiser didn’t need much incentive to put him in the lockup.  With Val now at home, the Sergeant no longer had to work out what to do with the children.  There was nothing to stop a little ‘holiday’ happening.

Basically, there was no way he could have a drink in peace, so why bother?

Bill decided that he may as well give the grog away altogether.  So he did.

The pendulum swung to the opposite extreme.

Bill and Val  joined the Seventh-Day Adventist Church.

Adventists made teetotallers look like indulgers.  The Church embraced most aspects of the Temperance Movement of the mid-nineteenth century and took it a bit further.  “Moderation in the things that are good for you, and abstinence from those things that are bad for you.”  Hard to argue with when you think about it.

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The Adventists had a religious genealogy that harks back to the reformers. And there was certainly something to reform. The title of this brochure borrows from that famous work, The Pilgrims Progress.

Good Adventists didn’t smoke or drink alcohol, didn’t drink tea or coffee, didn’t eat meat, didn’t go to the movies, didn’t work on Saturday, didn’t shop on Saturday, didn’t swim on Saturday…. and paid 10% of their income in tithe.

Adventists topped the teatotallers.

Tea and coffee hit the Adventist list of things that are not good for you and thereby made the ‘thou shalt not’ list.  In that sense, Adventist went further than the Temperance Movement teatotallers.

But that was just what Bill needed.

He could never have just one drink.

However, Bill never gave tea away.  He would have his tea, even if it meant being a Badventist.

All Bill’s pendulum opposite jolt took was a call to his father Bert, who was working on the Seventh Day Adventist Mona Mona Mission near Kuranda.  Before Bill knew it, Adventist Colporteur George Walker was on the case and on the doorstep.  Ironically, as an ex-detective, George was on the case.

So there we have it.  Some ‘Bossy Matron and Caring Cop love’ probably kept a family together.

Now here’s the thing about the ‘topping the teatotallers’ Adventist experience….  Bill and Val enjoyed quality family time and they never got on better together.

As for the tithing, that didn’t seem to do much harm.   They worked their way out of debt and were starting to save.

In fact, they could have had savings at the end of the Heartbreak Corner experience, except they had a hungry Land-Rover to feed, but that’s another story.

Meantime Back at the Oil Rig

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Val was in Tambo Hospital confined with her 4th child who had been delivered on 7th September, 1957. Bill was compelled to be superdad for a week.

As it happened, early in that very week, a truck came to the Oil Rig.

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The crane truck was used to load and unload the various trucks that were coming to the Oil Rig as it was taken to pieces to be used in other locations like Weipa and Timor.

Bill needed to operate the crane truck to help unload it and then load it up again.

Bill was in a real bind. He couldn’t operate the crane truck with the 3 children in the truck, because they would be too distracting. He couldn’t leave them at large, because he couldn’t be sure that the children wouldn’t get in the road and into harms way.

What could he do?

The only solution seemed to be to lock them in one of the altents. That’s just what he did. He locked all 3 in the kitchen Altent and dealt with the matter at hand.

When the truck was seen to and gone, he open the door of Altent. Nothing could have prepared him for the what awaited him. 3 children can do a lot an hour, even without assistance. They had managed to get into and open almost everything imaginable – powdered milk, honey, flour…..

The place was a disaster. The kids were a mess. And Bill was on his own. It was like an overdone food-fight scene from a Disney movie.

Oil Rig Site Map

A sketch of the site of the Oil Rig and the Altents were Bill and Val and children lived. Notice the washing area in front of the Altents and water drums on the other site,

He did the best he could to clean up the kitchen and the kids.

Now by this time in addition to the mess from the children there were dirty nappies, dirty clothes and now dirty kids and a dirty kitchen. He’d been batching in primitive conditions for much of the week.

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The wash stand can be seen with a small dish in front of the bonnet of the Land-Rover and the large tubs with handles can be seen over the top of the bonnet.

Bill had to make a serious attack on the washing and that was quite a process at the best of times.

There were were 2 tubs on a washing stand that Bill had made. One tub was used for washing and the other was for rinsing the clothes.

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Val washing up the dishes at the wash stand between the Altents. Notice the bucket in front of the tree used to carry water from the 44 gallon drums to the tubs for washing or for baths or to the kitchen for domestic use.

A kerosene tin was used to boil the clothes that needed boiling since no copper was available.  Polyester clothes were a real hit because they didn’t need boiling.

The water had to be carried in buckets from the three 44 gallon drums which were the water storage.

Those same tubs were used for bathing. They had handle and were lifted down from the wash-stand at bath time. In winter, which was freezing cold, the tub was placed near the cooking fire, which was between the 2 Altents. On the fire-side, you boiled and on the other side you froze – all in the same tub at the same time.

And then there were the dishes…..

Bill, as matron had insisted, was able to get by.she_who_must_be_obeyed_postcards_package_of_8

Blokes, if you think it is tough to manage these days, spare a thought for Bill, who all round had a pretty tough week. He was being superdad in circumstances that were about as difficult as you could get. But, at the insistence of Hospital Boss and Sergeant Eiser, he manned up and got through it.  Job done!imgres-1

A Deferral and a Slap

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It was visiting hours at Tambo Hospital on the 9th September, 1957.

Val had a baby on the preceding Saturday.  Bill had been ordered out of town by the Sergeant Eiser after being overzealous in celebrating.imgres-3

Bill had visited out of hours on Sunday night to plead with Val to come home.

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Bill used the Crane for travel into Tambo because he had hit a pig in the ute and it took some time to repair. The cabin of the truck was big and the whole family could fit. There was no requirement to wear seat-belts in vehicles in 1957.

Bill brought the 3 children in the 25 miles from Oil Rig to pick up their new brother and their mother.

They travelled in the crane truck rather than the ute, because the ute had a stoved-in mudguard from Bill hitting a pig.

He brought the children expectantly into the maternity ward. They would sort out the arrangements and Val would come home with him.

Life was about to return to normal except for the minor distraction of the most celebrated son.

But suddenly, that party was over.

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The matron of a hospital had considerable authority in 1957, particularly in small places like Tambo where there was generally no resident doctor.

In marched the Matron.

‘Nurse, take these children and give them a bath and something to eat.’, she ordered. The nurse dutifully whisked the children off and Bill was left impotently protesting, ‘They are clean and I’ve fed them’.

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Sergeant Eiser had warned Bill that they woud be watching him. Tambo was small and the Oil Rig vehicles were clearly marked so he had no chance of slipping under the radar. Robert De Niro in Meet the Folkers.

There was little doubt that the Police Sergeant Eiser and the Matron had a little child welfare network going and they knew just how to handle fellows like Bill – no ifs or buts.

Bill seethed as he put up with the indignity. He could still hear the Sergeant’s warning, ‘We’re watching you.’ Any objection here would probably involve another lecture from the Sergeant and maybe some time in the lockup.

What was even worse, Val was not coming home. The Matron had put her foot down. ‘Your wife needs rest and she is staying here’, she said in a way that did not brook argument.

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The nurses whisked the 3 children and washed and fed them.

She was bossy enough herself in those days when the matron ruled with a rod of iron. There was little doubt that she had the backing of the local law enforcement officers.

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Johanne, Billy, Lynda and Bill. The children went home scrubbed to the point of shining and full of food. Bill simply had to cop the obvious slap in the face to his standard of washing and feeding children.

Visiting hours over, Bill bundled the super-clean and well-fed children into the crane truck and lumbered 25 mile back to the Oil Rig, resigned to whole week as superdad.

In Bill’s own phraseology, his ears hung down like a mule, as he made his way back over the 25 bumpy miles back to Oil Rig in the crane truck.

He was resigned to his fate, but worse was yet to come.

Monday Rounds at Tambo Hospital

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Val had just given birth to her 4th child Allen at the Tambo Hospital on the 7th September, 1957 and was now recovering in the Maternity Ward.

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The confinement time in maternity used to be around a week which gaves mothers time to get to recover and prepare for the rigours of home life with a new baby.

The normal confinement time was a week. This time was intended to give the new mother time to recover and the time to get the baby into routine.

Labour had come quickly and had caught them by surprise and Bill had to do the last minute shop by himself at Millers General Store.

Val had received a late night visit from Bill who had pleaded with her to get out early.

On the Monday morning, the Matron was doing the rounds of the wards.

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Matrons were real authority figures. Few patients would question a direction from a nursing sister, let alone a matron in 1957.

‘How are we, today, Mrs Wight?’, Matron asked, in that caring way that good nurses do.

‘I’m doing fine, thank you’, Val responded, ‘but actually, (long pause), I really do need to go home’.

‘Oh no, you need your rest, Mrs Wight’, responded Matron in her best matron manner.

‘But I do really need to go home’, persisted Val.

‘No! You need to be here and you need to be getting your rest’, came the firmer, more authoritarian response.

‘You see, my husbands not really coping’, bargained Val, ‘he really can’t manage’.

‘Well, he’s just going to have to’, finalised Matron, ‘he’s just going to have to.’ You’re staying here!’ in end of conversation tone.

imgres-1There wasn’t much doubt Matron and Sergeant Eiser had a good working relationship and that the channels of communication were open.

So Val stayed the usual 7 days in hospital, Bill got by as best he could, and all of the children made it too.

Bill’s Special Visiting Hours

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Bill was shaken by his run in with the law. But unabashed.

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Bill rammed a boar pig in the ute on the way from Tambo to the Oil Rig.

He had been beaten by the law, but he sure showed that boer pig who was boss.

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Bill had kids and they were driving him crazy.

He drank steadily all day Sunday 8th September, 1957 and dealt with the kids as best he could, but basically they drove him crazy.

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Sergeant Eiser and Constable Andy Stagg had warned Bill, ‘We’re watching you’ and they were as good as their word. Robert De Nero letting Ben Stiller know that he was being watched in ‘Meet the Fockers’.

Bill didn’t make it for visiting hours.  Sergeant Eiser’s ‘We’re watching you’ warning was still ringing in his ears.  He didn’t feel like coming under the watchful eye of the Sergeant or Constable Andy Stagg with ODE decals all over his vehicle.imgres-2

He was now a solo parent and it was in the most difficult circumstances.  He had the obligations of his job with ODE and he had a big maintenance program on the Oil Rig.  In addition, he also had to show visitors around and load and unload trucks as they came to dismantle the Oil Rig.  The Oil Rig had finished its work and the drill hole had been capped.

Bill had to carry water from 5 mile away at the bore.  After bringing it back in 44 gallon drums, they then had to dip buckets into the drums and carry water for household use, washing and bathing.

There were no neighbours for miles around.  There was no family for hundreds of miles.

There was no electricity.

Oil Rig Site Map

Val sketched a rough site map which shows the relative position of the Oil Rig Site and the accommodation. Bill and Val moved to the Altents after the drill hole was capped. Previously they had lived in an annex near Bert & Dorrie’s Wights caravan.

Cooking was done on an open fire between the 2 Altents with a few pot and pans.

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Bill and Val’s Altents. They had guaze and windows and a lockable door as had ventilation in the dome of the roof. They slept in the one on the left and used the one behind the Land-Rover as a kitchen.

They didn’t live in a house, they lived in 2 Altents.  One was for the kitchen and the other for the bedroom and there was open ground in between.

And then there was the kids.

imgres-8Billy was 4 and a knowall. He couldn’t be told anything and never stopped talking.

Johanne was 2½ and highly strung and if her routine was interrupted one little bit, she lost it.

Lynda was 15 months, highly mobile and into everything.

Bill was desperate, he couldn’t keep this up. He formed a desperate plan and headed for Tambo to put it into action.

He drove to the hospital without attracting the attention of Andy or the Sergeant.

He locked the kids in the vehicle and broke into the maternity ward.

He woke Val up. ‘You have to leave right now’. he urged. ‘Today has been a disaster and I can’t have a job and look after the kids’, he pleaded, ‘You need to come home now’.sahm

‘I can’t just leave’, she reasoned, ‘the baby is in the nursery’.  He pleaded for a while longer, and she relented and said, ‘I’ll talk to the Matron and get out tomorrow.’

He left and headed back home to the Oil Rig with the prospect of some welcome relief on the morrow.

A Celebration Too Far

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‘I have a new son!!’ beamed Bill to anyone who would listen in the bar of the Club Hotel in Tambo.  It was Saturday 7th September, 1957.  Val was recovering in the maternity ward of the Tambo Hospital, the new bairn in the nursery and his other 3 children in the car outside.

Whilst birth might now be a family event, in 1957 there was no way that a husband would be allowed into the sanctity of the delivery ward, especially with 3 siblings.

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Bill holding Lynda alongside the ODE International. Bill(y) and Johanne are standing beside him.

Having been ordered out of the way earlier in the day with Billy, Johanne and Lynda, he was officially now on solo father duty.

What would he do?  How would he celebrate being a dad again?

Ah, of course, the Club Hotel bar beckoned.  He would go and have a beer and a chat with John Steer, the publican.

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The International Utility truck belonging to ODE. The Wight children waited in the ute outside the pub all day while Bill drank at the bar. The whole family could fit into the very large cab. The children could sleep in the back. This picture was taken after Val come home with the baby whose birth was being so enthusiastically celebrated.

Kids did sit outside in the car those days.  Probably not without complaint.  But it wouldn’t put a parent in the bind that it would nowadays.

Dutifully, Bill went and checked in progress at the Hospital.  Yes!  Operation a success, his manhood proved again.  Allen had entered the world.

Ushered out of the hospital again, Bill went straight back to the only place to celebrate, the Club Hotel.  Again, the 3 kids sat out in the car, checked on from time to time by Bill who went on celebrating far on into the afternoon.

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The 3 Wight kids spent all day stuck in the car outside the Club Hotel in Tambo on 7th September, 1957.

The kids sitting in the car came to attention of the local police.  For these local police, kids in the car outside of a pub all day was not going to happen on their watch.  In 1957, most things that happened in families was the head of the families’ business.   They decided this matter needed attention.

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The Queensland Police with the motto.

Senior Sergeant  WA Eiser went into the bar and located the celebrating new father.

Sergeant Eiser did his best to apply the ‘Firmness with Courtesy’ principle of the motto of Queensland Police Service.  He pointed out to Bill that he was a family man and that he needed to get the children home and not leave them sitting out in the car.

Bill assured him that everything was under control and he didn’t need the advice.  The kids were just fine.

At the insistance of Sergeant Eiser, they left the bar and went out to the car, so that Bill could show him that the kids were OK.

Then Bill, in his own words, began to mouth off at Sergeant Eiser.   ‘I’m looking after them and they are just fine thank you very much, SIR.  They are being fed and they are are having plenty to drink, SIR.’

Courtesy was not being beamed back to the good Sergeant from Bill, nor respect for the authority of the law.

Bill could be fiery and he had the broken nose scars to prove it.  ‘And I don’t need your bloody help, SIR’, mouthed Bill defiantly.

‘OY Andy!’, yelled Sergeant Eiser and the next thing Bill knew, he was lying over the bonnet of the ute, with his arm up his back in a half-nelson.  Bill was in Constable Andy Stagg’s vice-like grip and he wasn’t going anywhere.  Andy had been quietly waiting around the corner, just in case the matter proved troublesome and was there in a flash when called on.

Qld Police Uniform 1949

Police in uniform in Brisbane around 1949. The Tambo Police Sergeant and Constable Andy would have been dressed similarly to the officers in the middle on the picture. Picture from thetannykid in flickr.

 

With Bill now more cooperative, Sergeant Eiser checked Lynda’s napkin.  Fortunately for Bill, he had recently changed it and it was dry.

Now the lecture began in earnest.  And Bill just had to cop it thanks to Andy.

‘I should put you in the lockup and the only reason I’m not, is that we don’t have a place for those children.’ the Sergeant lectured.

‘Now you – get home – right now!!’, he ordered.

‘And don’t forget, we’re watching you!’, he warned.

Shaken and subdued, Bill got into the ute and hightailed it for the Oil Rig.

 

 

On the way home, he hit a big boer pig and stoved in the mudguard of the ute as he rammed it into the bank of a cutting.

He bragged about ramming the pig for years but not so much the rest of the story.

(**Editor – The source of this story is Bill himself.  He had the ability to laugh at himself.  He could have taken this story to his grave because no-one present at the incident was seen again after 1958, but he revealed this and a few others interesting tales that are part of who he was.)

 

 

 

 

 

Return to Heartbreak Corner

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As we approached Roma to stock up some essentials – savoury biscuits, dips, wine and ice – Val contrasted this journey with the last time she travelled this way.  That was a lifetime ago.

After more than half a century, Val and I would return to places that Val had thought about many times over the intervening years and this journey would bring back to her mind people, events and hardships from her long ago.  She would find some answers to oft-mused questions; ‘I wonder what life held for…..’ ‘Is any trace left of…..’’

In 1957, Bill and Val left the electricity, the running water and the paved roads of ‘Joe Doke town’ Maryborough for a tent at an oil exploration rig site by the side of the Tambo-Alpha Road.

Their mission was to take up the employment found to work their way out of the debt from a failed business venture and to support a car they couldn’t afford.  After that job ran out, they went on from this personal Heartbreak Corner to the geographical Heartbreak Corner to Clifton Bore near Windorah in the heart of the Channel Country.

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A channel country flood map from 1949. Shows the Barcoo where Tambo and the Oil Rig where and Windorah which is near the Cooper Creek.

 

It is rightly called Heartbreak Corner.

And yet, they survived, poorer but richer for the experience.

They saw and experienced the places that inspired Banjo and ‘My Country’ in the late eighteen hundreds.  They saw ‘where the western rivers run’.  They saw ‘where the pelican builds her nest’. They fished for yellowbelly and yabbies in the legendary Cooper Creek.

Alongside that stuff of legend, in the clear skies of that remoteness, they saw the trail of Sputnik which would plummet the modern world further into cold war.

On this return to heartbreak corner, Val did see some traces of yesteryear and she found something of what life held for those she hadn’t heard about for over 50 years.

Madelyn’s Special Bond with the Anzacs Fastest Hog

Bert Wight’s time in the RAAF in WW2 was absolutely energised by his association with Americans.  In his first week at Bachelor Airbase, Leading Aircraftsman Wight struck up a great relationship with his Yankee boss by rendering him a great service.

Bert Wight with his Yankee Boss after getting his car going for him.

The Adjutant was certainly impressed by Bert taming the killer Hog, but Bert made him a real friend by rendering a service by being the brilliant mechanic that he was.  Bert discovered from a discussion that a number of jeeps had been delivered to the base and they just wouldn’t start.

“Let me have a look.  I worked as a mechanic before the war.” he enthused.  Bert was an A grade mechanic.  It was with good reason that he never lacked confidence and relished solving tough problems.

“If you can get this one going,’ his boss stated, ‘it’s mine.’

It didn’t take long for Bert to diagnose that the problem was electrical, as there was no spark at the business end of the spark plug leads.

‘Strange’, Bert thought, ‘these are new vehicles with new batteries.’  ‘And the batteries have plenty of charge,’ he reasoned, ‘it must be further back.’    Bert worked out that the problem was as simple as grease in the ignition points.  Grease put there by design to prevent corrosion on the sea voyage from the US to Australia.

Madelyn in front of the American left hand drive WW2 Jeep like the one Bert got going for his Yankee Boss.

Bert now really had a friend in his boss.  And well…. life just got better between Bert and the Americans.

Bert had a killer bike, he had the run of the place and could’t be stopped because of the black armbands.   And he had friends in high places.

Madelyn standing on the running board of an American WW2 truck.

Bert admired Americans throughout his life and even took on aspects of their accent in his speech, which he retained for the rest of his life.  He always pronounced the word ‘new’ as ‘noo’ rather than the Strine pronunciation of ‘nee-u’, much to the amusement of the ‘Children of the Road.’

This all happened in 1943 at Bachelor Air Base in the Northern Territory of Australia.

Far away, in time and place, a baby girl came into the world exactly half a century later and half a world away.  Madelyn became Bert’s Yankee great great granddaughter.  She was born in Chico, California and so Bert had a Yankee Granddaughter.  He would have loved it.

When Madelyn discovered that not only had her great great grandpa done something for the Anzacs but in so doing, had worked for Americans, rode an American Hog and loved Americans, she was mightily impressed.  As an Australian, she loves to identify as an American.

What a bonus that at the Madelyn’s first Anzac dawn service, there were 2 American WW2 vehicles on display.  One of them happened  to be a Jeep just like Bert had managed to get running for his Yankee boss almost 60 years before.

It was absolutely necessary for Madelyn to have a good look at the Jeep with the steering on the left hand side.

By contrast to Bert supercharged Hog, there was a WW2 BSA motorcycle on display.  This was what the Australian Intel riders rode to carry out their duties.  Not as fast by half as Bert’s Hog, but definitely worth a look and a picture.

Madelyn beside a WW2 BSA motorcycle NOT like Bert used to ride.

So, half a world and half a century apart, Bert and his Yankee granddaughter share a special American bond.

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