The Little Digger

Anzacday_2013_webheaderKai (9) and Taj (6) Stitt had something really special for ANZAC parade at South Kolan State School.  Each of them was going to honour a great great grandfather who served Australia in World War 2.  Kai was honouring Bert Wight who served in the RAAF and Taj was honouring Keith Conroy.  What made it special was that they were able wear replicas of Bert and Keith’s medals and what made it even more special was Taj was wearing one of Keith genuine medals.  It was awarded to him posthumously.

Keith Conroy with his daughter Valerie in Hyde Park, Sydney in 1943 while on leave.

The Little Digger.  Keith Conroy with his daughter Valerie in Hyde Park, Sydney in 1943 while on leave. He had just had all of his teeth removed according to standard army procedure.

Grandmother Johanne Stitt had gone to the war service record office to find what each grandfather had been awarded.  She wanted to buy replicas for Kai and Taj for South Kolan School’s ANZAC parade.  She wanted to also order the equivalent of the medals in ribbons for  Charlee and Billy Ironside to wear at their ANZAC parade in Townsville.

However, Johanne discovered an omission from the record.  After a lot of digging and a lot of help from the records office, she uncovered that Keith Conroy had never received one of his awards and so it was awarded to him posthumously.  That meant that Taj was going to  South Kolan State School ANZAC parade wearing an original medal.

Keith Conroy joined the army in Sydney and was fortunate enough to serve around Sydney during the whole of WW2.  He was honoured this ANZAC day by Ashley in Brisbane, Taj in South Kolan and Billy in Townsville.  They all wore his medals.  Little diggers honouring their own Little Digger.

Taj at his school's ANZAC parade with Grandpa Keith Conroy's original medal.

Taj at his school’s ANZAC parade with Grandpa Keith Conroy’s original medal. The medal on the left is the original and the others are replicas.

Keith staying around Sydney was very fortunate for his family, who lived in Paddington in Sydney’s eastern suburbs.  He would come home on leave and would light the copper, cut the wood and do a whole lot of things around the house that were difficult for the woman.  Keith’s wife Isobel lived with her grandmother Elizabeth Brown (who was the daughter of 2 convicts) and their little girl Valerie.  Isobel had cerebral palsy from a birth injury and required a lot of help around the house.

Valerie, who is the great grandmother of Kai, Taj, Charlee, Billy, Maddie and Ashley was just 6 years old and she went to school at Darlinghurst Primary School.

Things were very challenging for children during the war.  They had to have ration tickets as well as money for almost everything they wanted to buy.  They could almost never have sweets because everything was in short supply.

The Kuttabul was sunk with loss of life in Sydney Harbour.

The Kuttabul was sunk with loss of life in Sydney Harbour.

Children and their families lived in constant fear of being invaded by the Japanese.  It became more of a real threat after 2 miniature submarines infiltrated Sydney Harbour, sunk some shipping and took some lives.

The thing the Japanese were really trying to do was to have the population living in fear of attack and they succeeded very well at this.

The submarine for sinking shipping in Sydney Harbour.

The submarine reponsible for sinking shipping in Sydney Harbour.

Schools had air-raid drills, so that children knew what to do if there was ever an air-raid.  The school-yard had deep trenches with concrete walls.  There were seats for the children to sit on along the walls of the trenches.  Wardens who wore gas masks and had metal helmets supervised the drills.

Sydney lived in real fear of air-raids, not just during the day, but also at night.  When the air-raid siren sounded at night, everybody had to reduce their lighting to at absolute minimum and draw their curtains, so that there was no light visible from outside.

Coastal cities like Sydney and Newcastle ran low lights at night.

Coastal cities like Sydney and Newcastle ran low lights at night.

If any light was visible from your house, wardens would bang on your door and demand that you turned down the lights and seal your curtains properly.

The fears about attack were very real as submarines were on the East Coast of Australia.

The fears about attack were very real as submarines were off the East Coast of Australia.

Just to ensure that the population was kept in a constant state of anxiety, the Japanese would occasionally shell the major cities like Sydney and Newcastle from submarines.  These tactics would inflict little real damage, but proved that the Japanese could get through defenses.

Manly Beach in Sydney with barbed wire defences. during WW2.

Manly Beach in Sydney with barbed wire defences during WW2.

The level of anxiety in Sydney was very visible at the beach.  Iconic beaches like Manly Beach had barbed-wire barricades.  This was intended to slow down the enemy coming from the sea.  The war was a real threat to civilians, it wasn’t faced only by the troops.  The war was right in Sydney and that is why it was important to have people like Keith serving in Australia.

Valerie was a lucky girl because she saw her Dad quite often, other children didn’t see their dad for years and very sadly, some children never saw their dad again after he left on a troop ship.

While Keith was working hard to make sure that Sydney was defended and Australia was working well with its new United States allies, the other grandpa,  Bert Wight was in service in the RAAF in the Northern Territory.

CAC produced the Wirraway which was designed as a trainer but pulled in to active service

CAC produced the Wirraway which was designed as a trainer but taken into combat service.

Before joining up, Bert Wight worked at the Commonwealth Aircraft Corporation (CAC) at Fisherman’s Bend in Melbourne.  He was engaged in what was termed an ‘essential service’ and was therefore exempted from military service.  However, when Bert had a major argument with wife Dorrie and she kicked him out, he was really angry and in a fit of pique joined the RAAF.  He was posted to Batchelor Air-base in the Northern Territory, which is around 100km south of Darwin.  Batchelor became a major air-base and was home to a joint Dutch East Indies Air Force and the US Air-Force as well as the RAAF.

The Dutch had been overrun in Indonesia (Netherland East Indies) by the Japanese and in Holland by the Germans.  A special joint squadron was formed with the RAAF.  The Dutch war-time parliament ran in exile from Brussels.

The American Mitchell B25 Bomber operated out of Batchelor Airbase.

The American B25-Mitchell Bomber operated out of Batchelor Airbase.

Batchelor became a centre of the Dutch world-wide intelligence radio network.  The Dutch had predicted the rise of the Japanese through their intelligence network in the early 1930’s.  The No 18 NEI (Netherlands East Indies) Squadron of the RAAF flew B25-Mitchell bombers.  It was on one of these planes the Bert flew over NEI as an observer.

Kai with Bert Wight's medals on his chest at the South Kolan State School ANZAC parade.

Kai with Bert Wight’s medals on his chest at the South Kolan State School ANZAC parade.

Kai wore Bert’s medals to the ANZAC parade.  He was very proud of his great great grandfather whose original medals are still in the family.

In the meantime, up in Townsville, Charlee and Billy were attending their own ANZAC service.

Charlee and Billy Ironside wearing the ribbons for Bert Wight and Keith Conroy.

Charlee and Billy Ironside wearing the ribbons for Bert Wight and Keith Conroy. One is each side of their mother Joleen.

Life in Townsville was very much effected by World War 2.   There were multiple bombing raids on this northern outpost by the Japanese.  It was Queensland’s most northern centre of significant resistance to the Japanese advance.

Townsville Sound Detectors

Special set-up to ‘listen’ for Japanese aircraft in Townsville in WW2.

Townsville was geographically closer to where Bert served, than distant Melbourne, where his family lived during the war.  Families had to live together during the war to try to get by.  Bert’s aged father lived with Dorrie and his 2 boys, Bill and Jim.

Bert with Yankee boss at Batchelor Airbase which is about 100 km south on Darwin.

Bert with his Yankee boss at Batchelor Airbase which is about 100 km south of Darwin.

Bert served as a dornier and this meant that he carried intelligence on his American Air-Force Harley Davidson (or Indian) motorcycle.  He was honoured by Madelyn in Brisbane, Kai in South Kolan and Charlee in Townsville.  They wore his medals this ANZAC day.

Lest We Forget

Anzacday_2013_webheaderIt’s 4.20am.  No sign yet of first light.  The birds haven’t even given their first hint of welcome to a new day.  But Maddy (9), Ashley (7) and Kellan (4) are greeting it with gusto  – they’re enthusiastically getting ready for an early start.

It’s ANZAC day, that one day of the year, where 2 young nations get a day out to honour those who fought and sacrificed that we might be free.Ashley with Grandpa Conroy's medal and Madelyn with Grandpa Wights.

And the great thing is, that 98 years after that military blunder that squandered young lives and impoverished us of talent for a generation, we forget the blunder, and honour those sacrifices that gave the 2 young Antipodean nations identity.  Maddy, Ashley and Kellan wanted to go to the Dawn Service to remember.

Bert astride his US Air Force Indian motor cycle.

Bert astride his US Air Force Indian motor cycle.

Maddy got up and carefully pinned on Great Great Grandpa Bert Wight’s replica medals.  She’s honouring Bert who served in the RAAF.

He joined the air force in 1942 after working in the Australian Air Force Factory.  Bert was seconded to the US Air Force.  They had a major base at Batchelor in the NT.

Bert carried intelligence, wore black arms, packed a pistol and was able to go through all checkpoints without being stopped.

One of his jobs was to get the film for the photos taken during bombing raids.  He took the film directly from the aircraft to take them to HQ, so that nobody could interfere with them.  This was for intelligence purposes for effectiveness of the mission but also to ensure that bombs weren’t dropped over the sea instead of on the targets.

Bert told stories of going out to retrieve planes that crash-landed and his most graphic story was of seeing a tail-gunner’s remains hosed out of the rear gun turret of the  plane.

He admitted to soiling his britches when he was an observer on a raid over Indonesia.  Fortunately Bert didn’t actually sustain any physical  injuries during the war.

Keith with his daughter Valerie taken in Hyde Park in 1943 whilst he was on leave.

Keith with his daughter Valerie taken in Hyde Park in 1943 whilst he was on leave.

Ashley carefully pinned on Great Great Grandpa Keith Conroy’s replica medals.  She’s honouring Keith who served in the Army in the supply and resupply area.

Even Teddies get tired at ANZAC.

Even Teddies get tired at ANZAC.

He mainly served around Sydney, which also took him to Muswellbrook and Holsworthy.

He actually did sustain 2 injury’s whilst serving his country.  He was in the back of a truck which  lurched forward and he was thrown to the ground and broke his wrist.  Friendly fire?

After 6 weeks, he returned to service and found an army horse tangled in wire.   As he tried to free it, the horse kicked out and broke the other wrist.  Unfriendly fire?

Our intrepid little patriots headed off toward the Cenotaph at Redlands RSL at 0450 hours, after being dropped off by Nana.  They were amongst thousands who wanted to snare a close spot, but not even 4.50am was early enough to get a place where you could see everything.  But all things considered our spot wasn’t too bad.  We were right beside the Air Force Cadets and saw them begin their march.

Everybody held together really well, but the Teddies did tire at one stage.

 

Ashley and Maddy standing next a WW2 motor cycle like Bert Wight used to ride.

Ashley and Maddy standing next a WW2 motor cycle like Bert Wight used to ride.

After the service, we looked at the tributes on the cenotaph and then had a look around and saw some old equipment from WW2.  Some of which reminded us of some of Grandpa Wight’s experiences.

This is like the WW2 Willy Jeeps that Bert Wight repaired during the war.

This is like the WW2 Willy Jeeps that Bert Wight repaired during the war.

Bert really ingratiated himself to his Yankee boss by getting his Jeep going.  Bert was a motor mechanic by trade.

The Jeep hadn’t started straight off the boat.  It turned out that grease had been placed in the distributor to prevent rust during the sea voyage to Australia and as a result it had no spark.  Bert had it figured in no time flat.

Bert made this favour count for all it was worth!

So Bert was able to make 2 things from his civvy life work for him.  He was a mechanic and used his skills to get in sweet with the boss.  He raced motorbikes and got to ride one as one of his main jobs.

Tears at ANZAC as Kellan strives to reclaim favourite snuggling place next to Mum.

Tears at ANZAC as Kellan strives to reclaim favourite snuggling place next to Mum.

There were some tears from our smallest intrepid patriot.  Kellan was all happy while he was snuggled up to Mum (Kylie).  But when he stood up during a little lapse in concentration, Maddy jumped into the vacant spot and he was out!

Kellan wasn’t happy and neither was Teddy.  Eventually, being the baby, he prevailed and sweated Maddy out to reclaimed home base.

Poppies for Maddy, AShley and Kellan at the Dawn Service.

Poppies for Maddy, Ashley and Kellan at the Dawn Service.

To add a really nice touch to ANZAC 2013, an official from the RSL noticed a Mum and 3 children (plus 3 teddies) leaving the ceremony and called them over.  He had a poppy for each  child.  Something to top off the Dawn Service experience.

 

As we walked over and waited for Nana to pick us up, we walked by the entrance to the RSL precinct, which spelled out the message that we came to hear.  LEST WE FORGET.

The message we really came to hear.

The message we really came to hear.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Topping the Teatotallers

DSC_0445 - Version 3

imgres

Bill had Sergeant Eiser’s ‘we’re watching you’ message confirmed every time he drove into town. The police had him absolutely bluffed.

Bill was absolutely bluffed about the ‘We’re watching you’ warning from Police Sergeant Eiser and Constable Stagg.  The cops were as good as their word. Every time Bill had to go into Tambo, he had it confirmed that they watching.

Billy & Johanne - 1957

All Oil Drilling and Exploration (ODE) vehicles available to Bill were clearly marked with decals like this one on the door of the International ute.

In the end, it just wasn’t worth going to the pub.  Every vehicle had ODE decals on the doors and stood out like a sore thumb.  If he went incognito in the Land-Rover, it would break down and consume more repair time and more money on parts.  In any case, it had Mineral Sands signwriting on it and would be readily noticeable.

Bill had been on a serious alcoholic slide for a couple of years.  He had drunk his way through much of the initial payment for the Fraser Island mineral sands.  If there were more options for single mothers in 1957, he would have been on his own.

But Bill’s slide was arrested with a jolt, after he weighed up some options.

He had no doubt that the Sergeant Eiser didn’t need much incentive to put him in the lockup.  With Val now at home, the Sergeant no longer had to work out what to do with the children.  There was nothing to stop a little ‘holiday’ happening.

Basically, there was no way he could have a drink in peace, so why bother?

Bill decided that he may as well give the grog away altogether.  So he did.

The pendulum swung to the opposite extreme.

Bill and Val  joined the Seventh-Day Adventist Church.

Adventists made teetotallers look like indulgers.  The Church embraced most aspects of the Temperance Movement of the mid-nineteenth century and took it a bit further.  “Moderation in the things that are good for you, and abstinence from those things that are bad for you.”  Hard to argue with when you think about it.

tmprnce15full

The Adventists had a religious genealogy that harks back to the reformers. And there was certainly something to reform. The title of this brochure borrows from that famous work, The Pilgrims Progress.

Good Adventists didn’t smoke or drink alcohol, didn’t drink tea or coffee, didn’t eat meat, didn’t go to the movies, didn’t work on Saturday, didn’t shop on Saturday, didn’t swim on Saturday…. and paid 10% of their income in tithe.

Adventists topped the teatotallers.

Tea and coffee hit the Adventist list of things that are not good for you and thereby made the ‘thou shalt not’ list.  In that sense, Adventist went further than the Temperance Movement teatotallers.

But that was just what Bill needed.

He could never have just one drink.

However, Bill never gave tea away.  He would have his tea, even if it meant being a Badventist.

All Bill’s pendulum opposite jolt took was a call to his father Bert, who was working on the Seventh Day Adventist Mona Mona Mission near Kuranda.  Before Bill knew it, Adventist Colporteur George Walker was on the case and on the doorstep.  Ironically, as an ex-detective, George was on the case.

So there we have it.  Some ‘Bossy Matron and Caring Cop love’ probably kept a family together.

Now here’s the thing about the ‘topping the teatotallers’ Adventist experience….  Bill and Val enjoyed quality family time and they never got on better together.

As for the tithing, that didn’t seem to do much harm.   They worked their way out of debt and were starting to save.

In fact, they could have had savings at the end of the Heartbreak Corner experience, except they had a hungry Land-Rover to feed, but that’s another story.

Meantime Back at the Oil Rig

DSC_0445 - Version 3

Val was in Tambo Hospital confined with her 4th child who had been delivered on 7th September, 1957. Bill was compelled to be superdad for a week.

As it happened, early in that very week, a truck came to the Oil Rig.

Val & Kids with Truck_Tambo_Enhanced Arcsoft

The crane truck was used to load and unload the various trucks that were coming to the Oil Rig as it was taken to pieces to be used in other locations like Weipa and Timor.

Bill needed to operate the crane truck to help unload it and then load it up again.

Bill was in a real bind. He couldn’t operate the crane truck with the 3 children in the truck, because they would be too distracting. He couldn’t leave them at large, because he couldn’t be sure that the children wouldn’t get in the road and into harms way.

What could he do?

The only solution seemed to be to lock them in one of the altents. That’s just what he did. He locked all 3 in the kitchen Altent and dealt with the matter at hand.

When the truck was seen to and gone, he open the door of Altent. Nothing could have prepared him for the what awaited him. 3 children can do a lot an hour, even without assistance. They had managed to get into and open almost everything imaginable – powdered milk, honey, flour…..

The place was a disaster. The kids were a mess. And Bill was on his own. It was like an overdone food-fight scene from a Disney movie.

Oil Rig Site Map

A sketch of the site of the Oil Rig and the Altents were Bill and Val and children lived. Notice the washing area in front of the Altents and water drums on the other site,

He did the best he could to clean up the kitchen and the kids.

Now by this time in addition to the mess from the children there were dirty nappies, dirty clothes and now dirty kids and a dirty kitchen. He’d been batching in primitive conditions for much of the week.

5110311338_d0b738257a_o-1

The wash stand can be seen with a small dish in front of the bonnet of the Land-Rover and the large tubs with handles can be seen over the top of the bonnet.

Bill had to make a serious attack on the washing and that was quite a process at the best of times.

There were were 2 tubs on a washing stand that Bill had made. One tub was used for washing and the other was for rinsing the clothes.

5110310160_e1270e332c_o

Val washing up the dishes at the wash stand between the Altents. Notice the bucket in front of the tree used to carry water from the 44 gallon drums to the tubs for washing or for baths or to the kitchen for domestic use.

A kerosene tin was used to boil the clothes that needed boiling since no copper was available.  Polyester clothes were a real hit because they didn’t need boiling.

The water had to be carried in buckets from the three 44 gallon drums which were the water storage.

Those same tubs were used for bathing. They had handle and were lifted down from the wash-stand at bath time. In winter, which was freezing cold, the tub was placed near the cooking fire, which was between the 2 Altents. On the fire-side, you boiled and on the other side you froze – all in the same tub at the same time.

And then there were the dishes…..

Bill, as matron had insisted, was able to get by.she_who_must_be_obeyed_postcards_package_of_8

Blokes, if you think it is tough to manage these days, spare a thought for Bill, who all round had a pretty tough week. He was being superdad in circumstances that were about as difficult as you could get. But, at the insistence of Hospital Boss and Sergeant Eiser, he manned up and got through it.  Job done!imgres-1

A Deferral and a Slap

DSC_0445 - Version 3

It was visiting hours at Tambo Hospital on the 9th September, 1957.

Val had a baby on the preceding Saturday.  Bill had been ordered out of town by the Sergeant Eiser after being overzealous in celebrating.imgres-3

Bill had visited out of hours on Sunday night to plead with Val to come home.

Val & Kids with Truck_Tambo_Enhanced Arcsoft

Bill used the Crane for travel into Tambo because he had hit a pig in the ute and it took some time to repair. The cabin of the truck was big and the whole family could fit. There was no requirement to wear seat-belts in vehicles in 1957.

Bill brought the 3 children in the 25 miles from Oil Rig to pick up their new brother and their mother.

They travelled in the crane truck rather than the ute, because the ute had a stoved-in mudguard from Bill hitting a pig.

He brought the children expectantly into the maternity ward. They would sort out the arrangements and Val would come home with him.

Life was about to return to normal except for the minor distraction of the most celebrated son.

But suddenly, that party was over.

imgres-4

The matron of a hospital had considerable authority in 1957, particularly in small places like Tambo where there was generally no resident doctor.

In marched the Matron.

‘Nurse, take these children and give them a bath and something to eat.’, she ordered. The nurse dutifully whisked the children off and Bill was left impotently protesting, ‘They are clean and I’ve fed them’.

imgres

Sergeant Eiser had warned Bill that they woud be watching him. Tambo was small and the Oil Rig vehicles were clearly marked so he had no chance of slipping under the radar. Robert De Niro in Meet the Folkers.

There was little doubt that the Police Sergeant Eiser and the Matron had a little child welfare network going and they knew just how to handle fellows like Bill – no ifs or buts.

Bill seethed as he put up with the indignity. He could still hear the Sergeant’s warning, ‘We’re watching you.’ Any objection here would probably involve another lecture from the Sergeant and maybe some time in the lockup.

What was even worse, Val was not coming home. The Matron had put her foot down. ‘Your wife needs rest and she is staying here’, she said in a way that did not brook argument.

Nova-Scotia-nurses

The nurses whisked the 3 children and washed and fed them.

She was bossy enough herself in those days when the matron ruled with a rod of iron. There was little doubt that she had the backing of the local law enforcement officers.

5110268200_838d123187_o

Johanne, Billy, Lynda and Bill. The children went home scrubbed to the point of shining and full of food. Bill simply had to cop the obvious slap in the face to his standard of washing and feeding children.

Visiting hours over, Bill bundled the super-clean and well-fed children into the crane truck and lumbered 25 mile back to the Oil Rig, resigned to whole week as superdad.

In Bill’s own phraseology, his ears hung down like a mule, as he made his way back over the 25 bumpy miles back to Oil Rig in the crane truck.

He was resigned to his fate, but worse was yet to come.

Monday Rounds at Tambo Hospital

DSC_0445 - Version 3

Val had just given birth to her 4th child Allen at the Tambo Hospital on the 7th September, 1957 and was now recovering in the Maternity Ward.

imgres-5

The confinement time in maternity used to be around a week which gaves mothers time to get to recover and prepare for the rigours of home life with a new baby.

The normal confinement time was a week. This time was intended to give the new mother time to recover and the time to get the baby into routine.

Labour had come quickly and had caught them by surprise and Bill had to do the last minute shop by himself at Millers General Store.

Val had received a late night visit from Bill who had pleaded with her to get out early.

On the Monday morning, the Matron was doing the rounds of the wards.

imgres-4

Matrons were real authority figures. Few patients would question a direction from a nursing sister, let alone a matron in 1957.

‘How are we, today, Mrs Wight?’, Matron asked, in that caring way that good nurses do.

‘I’m doing fine, thank you’, Val responded, ‘but actually, (long pause), I really do need to go home’.

‘Oh no, you need your rest, Mrs Wight’, responded Matron in her best matron manner.

‘But I do really need to go home’, persisted Val.

‘No! You need to be here and you need to be getting your rest’, came the firmer, more authoritarian response.

‘You see, my husbands not really coping’, bargained Val, ‘he really can’t manage’.

‘Well, he’s just going to have to’, finalised Matron, ‘he’s just going to have to.’ You’re staying here!’ in end of conversation tone.

imgres-1There wasn’t much doubt Matron and Sergeant Eiser had a good working relationship and that the channels of communication were open.

So Val stayed the usual 7 days in hospital, Bill got by as best he could, and all of the children made it too.

Bill’s Special Visiting Hours

DSC_0445 - Version 3

Bill was shaken by his run in with the law. But unabashed.

imgres-6

Bill rammed a boar pig in the ute on the way from Tambo to the Oil Rig.

He had been beaten by the law, but he sure showed that boer pig who was boss.

imgres-9

Bill had kids and they were driving him crazy.

He drank steadily all day Sunday 8th September, 1957 and dealt with the kids as best he could, but basically they drove him crazy.

imgres

Sergeant Eiser and Constable Andy Stagg had warned Bill, ‘We’re watching you’ and they were as good as their word. Robert De Nero letting Ben Stiller know that he was being watched in ‘Meet the Fockers’.

Bill didn’t make it for visiting hours.  Sergeant Eiser’s ‘We’re watching you’ warning was still ringing in his ears.  He didn’t feel like coming under the watchful eye of the Sergeant or Constable Andy Stagg with ODE decals all over his vehicle.imgres-2

He was now a solo parent and it was in the most difficult circumstances.  He had the obligations of his job with ODE and he had a big maintenance program on the Oil Rig.  In addition, he also had to show visitors around and load and unload trucks as they came to dismantle the Oil Rig.  The Oil Rig had finished its work and the drill hole had been capped.

Bill had to carry water from 5 mile away at the bore.  After bringing it back in 44 gallon drums, they then had to dip buckets into the drums and carry water for household use, washing and bathing.

There were no neighbours for miles around.  There was no family for hundreds of miles.

There was no electricity.

Oil Rig Site Map

Val sketched a rough site map which shows the relative position of the Oil Rig Site and the accommodation. Bill and Val moved to the Altents after the drill hole was capped. Previously they had lived in an annex near Bert & Dorrie’s Wights caravan.

Cooking was done on an open fire between the 2 Altents with a few pot and pans.

5110311338_d0b738257a_o-1

Bill and Val’s Altents. They had guaze and windows and a lockable door as had ventilation in the dome of the roof. They slept in the one on the left and used the one behind the Land-Rover as a kitchen.

They didn’t live in a house, they lived in 2 Altents.  One was for the kitchen and the other for the bedroom and there was open ground in between.

And then there was the kids.

imgres-8Billy was 4 and a knowall. He couldn’t be told anything and never stopped talking.

Johanne was 2½ and highly strung and if her routine was interrupted one little bit, she lost it.

Lynda was 15 months, highly mobile and into everything.

Bill was desperate, he couldn’t keep this up. He formed a desperate plan and headed for Tambo to put it into action.

He drove to the hospital without attracting the attention of Andy or the Sergeant.

He locked the kids in the vehicle and broke into the maternity ward.

He woke Val up. ‘You have to leave right now’. he urged. ‘Today has been a disaster and I can’t have a job and look after the kids’, he pleaded, ‘You need to come home now’.sahm

‘I can’t just leave’, she reasoned, ‘the baby is in the nursery’.  He pleaded for a while longer, and she relented and said, ‘I’ll talk to the Matron and get out tomorrow.’

He left and headed back home to the Oil Rig with the prospect of some welcome relief on the morrow.

A Celebration Too Far

DSC_0445 - Version 3

‘I have a new son!!’ beamed Bill to anyone who would listen in the bar of the Club Hotel in Tambo.  It was Saturday 7th September, 1957.  Val was recovering in the maternity ward of the Tambo Hospital, the new bairn in the nursery and his other 3 children in the car outside.

Whilst birth might now be a family event, in 1957 there was no way that a husband would be allowed into the sanctity of the delivery ward, especially with 3 siblings.

5110268200_838d123187_o

Bill holding Lynda alongside the ODE International. Bill(y) and Johanne are standing beside him.

Having been ordered out of the way earlier in the day with Billy, Johanne and Lynda, he was officially now on solo father duty.

What would he do?  How would he celebrate being a dad again?

Ah, of course, the Club Hotel bar beckoned.  He would go and have a beer and a chat with John Steer, the publican.

5110304730_f3251f47b4_o-1

The International Utility truck belonging to ODE. The Wight children waited in the ute outside the pub all day while Bill drank at the bar. The whole family could fit into the very large cab. The children could sleep in the back. This picture was taken after Val come home with the baby whose birth was being so enthusiastically celebrated.

Kids did sit outside in the car those days.  Probably not without complaint.  But it wouldn’t put a parent in the bind that it would nowadays.

Dutifully, Bill went and checked in progress at the Hospital.  Yes!  Operation a success, his manhood proved again.  Allen had entered the world.

Ushered out of the hospital again, Bill went straight back to the only place to celebrate, the Club Hotel.  Again, the 3 kids sat out in the car, checked on from time to time by Bill who went on celebrating far on into the afternoon.

DSC_0589

The 3 Wight kids spent all day stuck in the car outside the Club Hotel in Tambo on 7th September, 1957.

The kids sitting in the car came to attention of the local police.  For these local police, kids in the car outside of a pub all day was not going to happen on their watch.  In 1957, most things that happened in families was the head of the families’ business.   They decided this matter needed attention.

Police Badge

The Queensland Police with the motto.

Senior Sergeant  WA Eiser went into the bar and located the celebrating new father.

Sergeant Eiser did his best to apply the ‘Firmness with Courtesy’ principle of the motto of Queensland Police Service.  He pointed out to Bill that he was a family man and that he needed to get the children home and not leave them sitting out in the car.

Bill assured him that everything was under control and he didn’t need the advice.  The kids were just fine.

At the insistance of Sergeant Eiser, they left the bar and went out to the car, so that Bill could show him that the kids were OK.

Then Bill, in his own words, began to mouth off at Sergeant Eiser.   ‘I’m looking after them and they are just fine thank you very much, SIR.  They are being fed and they are are having plenty to drink, SIR.’

Courtesy was not being beamed back to the good Sergeant from Bill, nor respect for the authority of the law.

Bill could be fiery and he had the broken nose scars to prove it.  ‘And I don’t need your bloody help, SIR’, mouthed Bill defiantly.

‘OY Andy!’, yelled Sergeant Eiser and the next thing Bill knew, he was lying over the bonnet of the ute, with his arm up his back in a half-nelson.  Bill was in Constable Andy Stagg’s vice-like grip and he wasn’t going anywhere.  Andy had been quietly waiting around the corner, just in case the matter proved troublesome and was there in a flash when called on.

Qld Police Uniform 1949

Police in uniform in Brisbane around 1949. The Tambo Police Sergeant and Constable Andy would have been dressed similarly to the officers in the middle on the picture. Picture from thetannykid in flickr.

 

With Bill now more cooperative, Sergeant Eiser checked Lynda’s napkin.  Fortunately for Bill, he had recently changed it and it was dry.

Now the lecture began in earnest.  And Bill just had to cop it thanks to Andy.

‘I should put you in the lockup and the only reason I’m not, is that we don’t have a place for those children.’ the Sergeant lectured.

‘Now you – get home – right now!!’, he ordered.

‘And don’t forget, we’re watching you!’, he warned.

Shaken and subdued, Bill got into the ute and hightailed it for the Oil Rig.

 

 

On the way home, he hit a big boer pig and stoved in the mudguard of the ute as he rammed it into the bank of a cutting.

He bragged about ramming the pig for years but not so much the rest of the story.

(**Editor – The source of this story is Bill himself.  He had the ability to laugh at himself.  He could have taken this story to his grave because no-one present at the incident was seen again after 1958, but he revealed this and a few others interesting tales that are part of who he was.)

 

 

 

 

 

Familiarity in Changed Places

DSC_0445 - Version 3

Val drove into Tambo, a little anxious, anticipating the changes wrought by bitumen roads, paved streets and modernisation, but really hoping for the familiar to manifest itself.

It was 55 years since Bill had wallowed into town first the first time at the wheel of the Plymouth Belvedere in June, 1957. Bill had come to take up a job as a roughneck at ODE’s Oil Rig, 25 miles out along the Tambo-Alpha Road.

The Land-Rover was an absolute money pit and the trailer proved too lights for the rigours of Heartbreak Corner

The Land-Rover was an absolute money pit and the trailer proved too lights for the rigours of Heartbreak Corner

It was 54 years since Val had trundled out of town at the wheel of a 1940’s Land-Rover towards a Channel Country thirsting in the clutches of drought. That was in April, 1958.

Welcome_to_Tambo_sign

Welcome to Tambo sign. Tambo is on the banks of the Barcoo and takes its name from the aboriginal word for ‘hidden place’.

We drove past the Welcome to Tambo sign and did a quick reconnoitre seeking places of the past looking for a connection with the present. Feeling welcome, yes, but wondering what it would be like to visit the places of the distant past.

General Store Tambo

This was Miller’s Store in 1957. Obviously Col Millier sold it and moved on. This is a 1986 picture taken by a University of Queensland country towns project

Millers Store – completely gone – business and premises. A classic general store in a country town that supported the rural community – incredible range, personal service. Col Miller obviously not here.  Val had expected that he would never leave.

Tambo Bakery_1986

THEN Tambo Bakery was a typical small town bakery in 1957. It served the local community and nearby communities like Alpha. 1986 picture from QU.

The Bakery – business – gone, but the building lives on as the home of the Tambo Teddies.  A typical bakery in 1957 it did the basics well, nothing fancy like you see in the little boutique bakeries of today.  The owner was possibly Col Pengilly and used to drive his bread to Alpha in his truck along the Tambo-Alpha Road past the ODE Oil Rig.

imgres-5

NOW The bakery was taken up as Tambo Teddies workshop. Some 29,000 teddies have made their way around the world.

Post_Office,_Tambo

The Tambo Post office was built in 1904. This is where Val used to pick up the pay cheque from ODE.

The Post Office – totally intact. Ahh, the times that Bill & Val travelled the 25 miles in from the Oil Rig to Tambo to check the mail and hope that the cheque from ODE’s head office in Sydney was waiting for them.

DSC_0541 - Version 2

THEN Tambo Hospital much as it was in 1957 and 1958. Val was in the maternity ward which was further on. Billy chatted to people on the front verandah when he stayed overnight in 1958 when he hurt himself at the Oil Rig.

NOW. Val outside of the Tambo Primary Health Centre in 2012. The maternity section she used in 1957 no longer exists.

The Hospital – once a regional facility – downsized and downgraded to a Primary Health Centre. Val came to Tambo with 3 little ones and the next child 3 months away.  Val gave birth in the no longer existing maternity section.

Club Hotel

The Club Hotel in Tambo. One of Bill’s watering holes. Pretty much as it was in 1957 when John Steer was the licencee.

The Club Hotel – Bill’s favourite pub – intact and still selling beer and food. We went there for dinner. There are stories to tell about this place.

DSC_0592

The Royal Hotel now but new in 1957 having been rebuilt in 1954. It was one of the original 4 hotels in the town.

The Royal Carrangarra Hotel – Bill’s other favourite pub – intact and still selling the essentials. In 1957, it was the new hotel having just been constructed. And much to the chagrin of the locals, was virtually totally booked out by those damn yanks from the Oil Rig. And to those damn yanks, it was hardly good enough.  To be good enough it would need to have been ‘AA boy… All American’.

The Police Station and Lockup – where Bill was so close to being a guest – totally renewed.  Bill was so close to spending time in the lockup he’d have been happy to know that it is totally gone and there is a new police station and lockup.

DSC_0547

This is where they serve the Great Tucker at the Club Hotel in Tambo. Val and Bill had dinner here, it was good and there was plenty of it.

The reconnoitre done, it was time to get the lowdown on where to start looking for the Oil Rig site. So as my custom is, I went to the bar of the Club Hotel and looked for a local who might know. In 5 minutes flat we hit paydirt  with Teddy Peacock who had been around since 1965.  We stayed for dinner.

DSC_0585

Our caravan at the Tambo Caravan park. Daphne managed to put us her original van. It was clean and the price was certainly right. Would not have done for some of our more discerning kin but OK for us.

Then off to the budget option in accommodation at the Tambo Caravan Park where our host Daphne Cartwright was friendly and shared plenty of good information to help us in our quest.  Daphne wears many hats and is a veritable local encyclopaedia.  She’s only been in town since 1988 but she knows her way around.

The Transport to Heartbreak Corner

Heartbreak Corner Theme Pic

On our  return to Heartbreak Corner, we zoomed along in veritable lounge chairs, on bitumen road in a vehicle manufactured in Japan.

We listen to stereo music of choice – John Williamson’s Warragul – probably not everybody’s choice, but ours.

Every now and again we tweak the air-conditioning to maintain that perfect level of ambiance for travelling comfort.

 

4 door Plymouth Belvedere

4 door Plymouth Belvedere like Bill and Val purchased in 1957, expect that theirs was a very nice green and didn’t have the chrome to create the different coloured area on the bottom portion.

A lifetime ago, Val wallowed along the corrugated dusty road to the outback in an overstated Yank Tank.

Dash of Belvedere

Steering Wheel and Dash of the Plymouth Belvedere. Apart from being left-hand drive this is the right look.

The windows were open, quarter-glass directing wind to the cool the driver and front passenger. If they passed a vehicle from the other direction, that had to quickly roll the up windows to avoid being smothered in dust. And they followed at a very respectable distance to avoid the dust cloud kicked up by the vehicle in front.

There was the radio for entertainment, when a station was close enough. The radio if it was going to prevail had complete with the roar of wind from open windows. And the seats, their 1957 Plymouth Belvedere had a lounge chair in the front and a lounge chair in the back.

Bill loved American big and beautiful and when he received the first tranche of money from their mineral sands lease being taken up, he paid the deposit to finance a beautiful green version of this car.  Have a listen to how it didn’t run. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W8yB0aNbxh0

Plymouth Belvedere 2 door

Plymouth Belvedere 2 door. Bill and Val had the 4 door version of the car. It was a big green and beautiful. Bill licked the steam off it.

After the rest of the money failed to materialise, Bill and Val were stuck with the big Yank Tank and the payments that went with it. Job prospects in Maryborough were poor and so this beauty had to go west for Bill to earn its keep. That’s what set them on the road to Heartbreak Corner.

The trek to Heartbreak Corner was taken just 12 years after WW2 had finished and the US was Australia’s new friend. The general populace were still learning more of the horrors of the Japanese treatment of Australian POW’s in Changai, on the Burma Railway and in other places. A wallowing Yank Tank was in perfect keeping with the times.

 

54 years later, we returned to Heartbreak Corner in a Mitsubishi Pajero.

Mitsubishi Pajero 4WD

The Mitsubishi Pajero in which Bill and Val travelled on the Return to Heartbreak. The sturdy 4WD was much better suited to the 1957 roads than the flashy Plymouth.

300px-A6M3_Zero_N712Z_1

Mitsubishi Zero Fighter from WW2. The Allies couldn’t match it for speed or manoeuvrability until well into the war. This image is of one used in the making the movie Pearl Harbour.

It was Mitsubishi that made the Zero which had a 12 to 1 kill rate against the allies. It was a faster, more maneuverable fighter plane that the allied aircraft could not compete with until 1942.

How times have changed.  It would have been unthinkable to drive a Mitsubishi in 1957.   And now, I wouldn’t even think about buying a American Motor Vehicle.  Although, in Spain, where Pajero means ‘wanker’, I would be driving a Montero.

Enter your e-mail address to receive notifications when there are new posts

Login